Avoiding Common Errors in Spanish: Subjunctive mood with activities II

By Maje

TemporalesHello everybody and welcome to a new post on the subjunctive mood and common errors in Spanish by English-speakers!

Today, we will give you some advice on how to explain the use of the subjunctive mood in time clauses. As we mentioned last week, our aim is to help students truly understand how to properly use the subjunctive mood.

First, tell your students to have a look at the following sentences:

a. Cuando tenga vacaciones, iré a México durante un mes.

b. Cuando tengo vacaciones, voy a México.

c. Cuando tuve vacaciones, fui a México.

Now ask your students to translate and explain the meaning of each sentence. Tell them to circle all verbs and write below which verb tense was used. What is the difference? Is the action in the first sentence completed or hypothetical/anticipated? What happens in b and c? Is the action hypothetical or completed? Maybe just factual? Allow your students to spend some time thinking about it and to come up with their own ideas.

See my (brief) explanation about time clauses below:

Temporales (2)

Common error in Spanish: Cuando tendré vacaciones, iré a México durante un mes or Cuando llego a casa, te llamaré. We do not use the future tense in the first clause, always the subjunctive mood when we talk about anticipated circumstances, an action that has not happened yet.

With después de and antes de , we can also use the infinitive if there’s only one subject. In that case, please tell your students to avoid another common error made by English speakers: do not use the -ing form!! In English you use the gerund after a preposition but in Spanish, always the infinitive.

Después de comiendo, voy a ver el partido de fútbol |Después de comer voy a ver el partido de fútbol.

Finally, tell them to complete the following sentences with the correct verb (and tense!):

1. Después de que (llegar, ellos) __________ a casa, nos llamaron por teléfono.

2. Hasta que no (acabar, yo) __________ los deberes, no podré ir con vosotros al centro comercial.

3. En cuanto (saber, él) __________ la verdad, no quiso ser más su amigo.

4. Cuando (levantarse, yo)__________ , me gusta desayunar primero.

5. Tan pronto como (acabar, nosotros) __________ este proyecto, haremos una cena para celebrar.

6. Después de que (acabar) __________ los exámenes, nos iremos de vacaciones dos semanas.

7. Cuando (levantarse, yo)__________ , escucharé la radio.

8. Entraron tan pronto como se (abrir, ellos) __________ puertas de la escuela.

9. Iré a la tienda antes de que (acabarse)__________ la leche.

10. Cuando (ser, yo) __________ mayor, quiero ser arquitecto.

1. Después de que llegaron a casa, nos llamaron por teléfono; 2. Hasta que no acabe los deberes, no podré ir con vosotros al centro comercial; 3. En cuanto supo la verdad, no quiso ser más su amigo; 4. Cuando me levanto, me gusta desayunar primero; 5. Tan pronto como acabemos este proyecto, haremos una cena para celebrar; 6. Después de que acabe los exámenes, nos iremos de vacaciones dos semanas; 7. Cuando me levante, escucharé la radio; 8. Entraron tan pronto como se abrieron puertas de la escuela; 9. Iré a la tienda antes de que se acabe la leche; 10. Cuando sea mayor, quiero ser arquitecto.

Extension task (Click to download): Working in groups, give your students one card and ask them to come up with 5 sentences about actions in future. Once they have done it, tell them to write 5 sentences about what they usually do in that situation and 5 more about what they did in the past.

For example:

Futuro: Cuando tenga vacaciones, visitaré a mi familia en España

Habitual: Cuanto tengo vacaciones, visito a mi familia en España

Pasado: Cuando tuve vacaciones el año pasado, visité a mi familia en España.

How do you teach grammar to your students? Grammar-translation method or task-based language learning? Do you have any lesson plan on time clauses that you would like to share with us? Let us know your thoughts.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s