El Día de los Muertos – Part 1

By Britta

You can download this after the cut.

You can download this after the cut.

El Día de los Muertos  – the Day of the Dead – is a centuries-old Mexican holiday with Aztec roots that is also connected to the Catholic calendar – a very Mexican mix! It reflects an attitude towards death that is different from some cultures. The beliefs and practices surrounding the Day of the Dead in Mexico predate the arrival of the Spanish in the Americas: At the end of the harvest, Mexicans held big banquets and remembered their dead relatives. They believed that death represents a passage into a better, parallel existence and for this reason they buried their dead with useful items to use in the next life.

El Día de los Muertos is celebrated between the 31st of October and 2nd of November and this year takes place at the end of the autumn half-tem.

To help you to introduce your students to the Mexican holiday and to encourage your students to take part in the festivities we have prepared a variety of resources for you to download. First up our article ¡Viva el Dia de los Muertos!

Do you have a special resource or personal souvenir or photograph relating to the Day of the Dead that you share with your students? We would love to see pictures of you using it.

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2 thoughts on “El Día de los Muertos – Part 1

  1. /Users/aliciaquintero/Desktop/Photo on 10-24-13 at 8.05 AM.jpg

    This is a great resources (let me know if you can’t see the picture). It is a book about Jose Guadalupe Posada Aguilar. He created lithographs related to the Day of the Dead. I believe- still learning- he was responsible for created the icon – El Catrín. Also, there is a whole backstory about the images associated with the Day of the Dead and the Mexican Revolution. This year I am trying to tie the cultural, political and historical.

    Once we get our Ofrenda up and going, I will post more photos!

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